Southern Cross Music Festival, KwaZulu Natal


The Southern Cross Music Festival will be held from Friday, 30 September 2011 till Sunday, 2 October 2011.  Every September the Southern Cross Music Festival showcases South African music in an exclusive event in the Hidden Valley on the banks of KwaZulu-Natal’s beautiful Mooi River.  The Southern Cross Music Festival has been a popular event on the music calendar since it was first staged in 1998.  The festival is held each year on the Southern Cross Farm, nestled in the Hidden valley, alongside a four kilometer stretch of the Mooi River, and is often referred to as the perfect festival venue.


The festival supports local and original music and art.  In addition to music, there’s fishing, swimming, white water rafting, abseiling, hikes, walks, mountain biking.  The farm is able to cater for 6 000 festival-goers however the organizers have decided to keep it small and exclusive-avoiding the trappings of capitalism thereby focusing on the original ideal “Music” and having the least impact on the environment as possible.  Apart from the excellent musical events held at Southern Cross, the Mooi River area also provides visitors with a variety of daytime activities in and around this beautiful area.


2011 is yet another year for musicians and music lovers, their families and invited guests.  It is essential to be prepared to camp – this is not a commercial event and there will be no stalls / market.  The performances at the festival focus mainly on blues, folk, jazz, light rock and ambience. In previous years the line-up has included Southern Cross favorites and newer bands such as skilled guitarist Dan Patlansky, Butter, The Hairy Legged Lentil Eaters, Guy Buttery, Josie Field, Lance Goldman and many more.  The venue attracts an audience of music and nature lovers which vary across both the age and race spectrum, and are loyal and supportive of the unique emerging musical talent found in South Africa.  A portion of the proceeds from the Southern Cross festival is donated to conservation.